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We are continuing our discussion on premature pad wear. This week we will be discussing even and taper pad wear. We have discussed several variations of pad wear and this blog post will be the last topic to discuss.

Problem:

One or more brake pads are wearing prematurely or irregularly

Cause:

All pads wearing evenly but prematurely can be caused by the front brakes being overworked due a rear brake problem or front caliper problems or a seized metering valve.

Premature wear of the outboard pad is caused when the outboard pad is not allowed to release off of the rotor properly after the brake pedal is released.

Solution:

Use the following images to help diagnose the cause of the pad wear condition.

Even Pad Wear (All pads worn evenly)

A. Accelerated pad wear (mild)

  • Change in vehicle use from previous set of pads
  • Front to rear brake balance not correct (i.e. rear brake(s) out of adjustment, restricted rear brake hose)
  • Metering valve stuck on open position (Only applies to RWD’s equipped with metering valves)
  • Calipers not allowing proper release of pads due to internal corrosion, seal rollback
  • Inferior friction or friction not suited to vehicle use

Change in Vehicle use from Previous Set of Pads

Front to Rear Brake Balance not correct (i.e. rear brake(s) out of adjustment, restricted rear brake hose)

Metering Valve Stuck in Open Position (Only applies to RWD’s equipped with metering valves)

Calipers not Allowing Proper Release of Pads due to Internal Corrosion, High Mileage OE Calipers, Inefficient Seal Rollback

Inferior Friction or friction not suited to vehicle use

B. Accelerated pad wear (severe)

  • Two foot driving
  • Vehicle being used for commercial application (i.e. delivery, taxi)
  • Venting not being allowed due to plugged or covered vent port in master cylinder

Two foot driving

Vehicle Being used for Commercial Application (i.e. delivery, taxi)

Venting not being Allowed due to Plugged Vent Port in Master Cylinder

Venting not being Allowed due to Covered Vent Port in Master Cylinder

 

Taper Pad Wear

Top to Bottom Taper Wear

Floating/sliding

  • End of pad experiencing wear is binding in bracket or knuckle (can‘t release)
  • End of pad opposite the wear is seized in bracket or knuckle (can‘t apply)

Fixed

  • End of pad experiencing wear is binding in caliper housing
  • End of pad experiencing wear caliper piston not releasing (4 piston caliper)
  • End of pad opposite the wear cannot apply due to seized caliper piston (4 piston caliper)
  • End of pad opposite the wear cannot apply due to pad seized in housing

Inside to Outside Taper Wear

Floating/sliding

  • Brake pad is binding on worn end and can‘t release
  • Brake pad is binding on non-worn end and can‘t apply evenly
  • Rear disc pad with piston locating tab – tab not aligned with piston notch

Fixed

  • End of pad experiencing wear is binding in caliper housing
  • End of pad experiencing wear caliper piston not releasing (4 piston caliper)

Rusting of Caliper Housing Casting Hole

End of pad experiencing wear is binding in bracket or knuckle (can‘t release)

Rear disc pad with piston locating tab – tab not aligned with piston notch

End of pad experiencing wear caliper piston not releasing (4 piston caliper)

This is the final blog post on premature pad wear. We hope that these posts have been informative for you. If you would like to send us feedback on our posts, please visit our Contact Us page and send us a message from there. Next week, we will be discussing a possible policy you should have on premature pad wear and how to help inform your customers so they are happy and safe.

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